© Jo-Anne McArthur
web by Octopixs
© Jo-Anne McArthur
web by Octopix
One of many dogs kept for student training at a veterinarian school in Europe.
Kittens in formaldehyde. Vet school, Canada.
Piglets at a research lab. Undisclosed location.
Research lab. Undisclosed location.
Research lab. This pig will live her entire life in this enclosure. Undisclosed location.
Research lab. Undisclosed location.
Piglets at a research lab. Undisclosed location.
Anatomy class. Canadian University, 2007.
Anatomy and dissection class. Canadian University, 2007.
A room in a vivisection lab that used to house dogs. 2008.
A vivisection training manual found at an old laboratory. 2008.
A "monkey chair" at a now defunct vivisection lab. 2008.
A vivisection training manual. 2008.
A neck restraint, used for primates. Found at a now defunct vivisection lab. 2008.
One of thousands of photographs found at a now defunct vivisection lab. This primate is held to the side of its cage by a neck restraint. 2008.
Old medical report found at a now defunct vivisection lab. 2008.
Old medical report found at a now defunct vivisection lab. 2008.
An old blood-soaked harness, used to restrain primates during research. 2008.
This mink was bred for fur. Once it grew to full size, it was killed by electrocution and then skinned. The bodies are then used at a university in a dissection and anatomy class. Canada, 2007.
"Sponges to stop the stupid bleeding". Cancer research/vivisection lab, Canada.
Roughly 98% of our genetic make-up is identical to that of chimpanzees. This statistic hit home for me while I was photographing this male chimp at Sanaga-Yong sanctuary in Cameroon. The bald patches on a normally hairy arm revealed just how similar we are in physique. The expression on his face, as well, both cautious and vulnerable, could be read as clearly as the expression on a human face.